• Nestling cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) beg for food. Photo by Glori Berry; http://gloriousbirds.com

  • Body wrap on an injured eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina). Photo by Harriet Forrester

  • Orphaned wood ducklings (Aix sponsa) feeding. Photo by Michele Goodman

  • Hand feeding an orphaned white-tailed fawn (Odocoileus virginianus). Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

  • Barred owl (Strix varia) prepares for release in flight cage. Photo by Glori Berry; http://gloriousbirds.com

  • Hand feeding an orphaned western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus). Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

  • Administering fluids to an injured snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina). Photo by Mark Mitchell, DVM, PhD

  • Rehabilitated bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) being released. Photo by Glori Berry; http://gloriousbirds.com

  • Orphaned striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) admitted for rehabilitation. Photo by Deb Welter

  • Hand feeding a nestling Steller's jay (Cyanoccita stelleri). Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

  • Injured big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) eating a mealworm. Photo by Deb Welter

  • Mallard hen (Anas platyrhynchos) with fishing hook injury. Photo by Michele Goodman

  • Orphaned red fox (Vulpes vulpes) kits feeding. Photo by Deb Welter

  • Injured Canada goose (Branta canadensis) with goslings. Photo by Michele Goodman

  • Orphaned Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) getting ready for exam. Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

  • Tube feeding an injured Leach's storm petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa). Photo by Diane Winn

  • Hand feeding an injured barred owl (Strix varia). Photo by Diane Winn

  • Hand feeding hatchling eastern phoebes (Sayornis phoebe). Photo by Glori Berry; http://gloriousbirds.com

  • Orphaned raccoon (Procyon lotor) in pre-release enclosure. Photo by Deb Welter

  • American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) being treated for a wing injury. Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

  • Injured rufous hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus) in rehabilitation. Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

  • Tube feeding an orphaned eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus). Photo by Dottie Tison; dottiesphotos@me.com

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Welcome to the National Wildlife Rehabilitator's Association!

The National Wildlife Rehabilitator's Association (NWRA) is dedicated to improving and promoting the profession of wildlife rehabilitation and its contributions to preserving natural ecosystems.

Conference Manager Position Available

The National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association (NWRA) is pleased to announce a new, part-time, paid staff position to manage the annual national educational and training symposium. Persons with prior experience in planning and orchestrating large educational conferences are encouraged to apply.  Job description and application information can be found here.

NWRA Wish List

From time to time, NWRA is asked what is needed to help us with our mission—to help with the many activities, programs, and projects underway. We have created this Wish List to itemize needs. Thank you for considering the option of donating needed items!

NWRA needs Member Input

In an effort to provide better member services, NWRA seeks member input. Periodic online surveys cover a variety of topics and are designed to be short and efficient. Members are notified of each survey through a Member Email. Responses help NWRA focus on member needs to plan and guide improvements in benefits and services.

NWRA is able to offer this service to members due to a partnership with QuestionPro.

 

NWRA